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A Promising Start in an Arid Region of the Anaqeed Al-Khair Cooperative’s Impact

Place: jordan, Asia
Sustainable development of small rural communities Sustainable development of small rural communities
Total Budget: € 230.000,00 | Period: From August 2009 To February 2011

Summary

The Anaqeed Al-Khair project targeted 14 villages for development. These villages were assimilated into one cluster, called the Northern Badia Villages cluster, and then grouped into four sub-clusters according to geographical distribution. The Northern Badia Villages cluster’s population is 7,800 individuals in 1,259 households.

The Project is located in Ruwdat Ameer Ali with a total area of about eight hectares (80 dunum). This project aims to generate income for the local communities as well as demonstrating economical and environmental benefits to target population.

Due to the project location and capacity, it also serves as centre training for all cluster village projects. In order to implement other proposed projects of Beekeeping and Honey Production, Free-Range Poultry for Egg Production, Sun Dried Tomatoes, Beit Sha’ar Manufacturing and Wool Manufacturing.

Partnership

The National Center for Research and Development - Jordan

Lead applicant

The National Center for Research and Development (NCRD) was established at the end of 2010 with an objective to develop scientific capabilities in the areas of nanotechnology, biotechnology, energy, Badia research and any other research interest of importance to Jordan. The Center assumed the responsibility over already existing centers and programs in the areas mentioned above. All legal, financial and administrative issues have been transferred to the Center. This arrangement provides an opportunity to maximize the utilization of facilities and the coordination of efforts in order to effectively participate in solving problems facing the various economic sectors. It is envisaged that NCRD will lead research activities in Jordan. This requires the prioritization of research fields, coordination of efforts, alleviation of obstacles and provision of logistical and financial support in order to reach research results that solve problems and develop new products and/or services in all industrial, agricultural, commercial and administrative fields. It is also anticipated that NCRD will participate in translating research results into new projects and investments, and create new employment opportunities. Our Vision: To strive to reach a reputable level in research fields in which Jordanians have a competitive advantage in or are of top priority to Jordan. Our Mission To fully employ research capabilities and expertise in serving the socio-economic development efforts of Jordan and to elevate the output of research activities in order to improve living conditions and to promote the creation of wealth ultimately leading to innovation in Jordan’s economy Objectives 1. Develop research capabilities in Jordan and create networks with researchers abroad. 2. Connect research results with other science, technology and innovation efforts and translate the research results into productive activities or businesses. 3. Participate in solving problems at the national level related to infrastructure, natural resources, and business and production requirements. In order to achieve the above objectives, NCRD performs the following activities: • Identification of local capabilities and efforts in areas of research, available at higher education institutions and research centers in Jordan, and coordination among them. • Establishment of new programs in research fields related to priorities in science, technology and innovation policy in Jordan. • Support for applied research, and encouraging innovation and invention in the fields of work of the center. • Encouraging the establishment of commercially viable companies based on research output. • Convening and participating in conferences, seminars, and workshops in the fields of research of the center. • Human resource development of research personnel and in doing so, cooperation with local, regional and international experts and organizations. • Building research networks among Jordanian researchers and their counterparts abroad. • Encouraging the establishment of research posts in universities and establishing a national network that utilizes sabbatical leaves and cooperative research work. The programs are: • Energy Research Programme • Badia Research Programme • Biotechnology Research Programme • Nanotechnology Research Programme • Water and Food Research Programme

Ministry of Planning and International cooperation - Jordan

Initiative partner

Objectives • National Objectives of the Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation: • Development of a flourishing national economy that is open to regional and international markets • Promotion of good governance so that central and local government bodies become financially stable, transparent, and accountable • Ensuring that Jordan is safe and an appropriate place to live in and work for current and future generations • Provision of appropriate infrastructure and efficient facilities with high return • To enhance the Jordanians’ self-reliance and to help who are unable to meet their basic needs. Institutional Objectives of the Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation: • Developing the economic environment and policies to achieve comprehensive and sustainable growth. • Raising the efficiency of institutional performance by following the best practices and standards in management, in a way that is reflected on the satisfaction of the ministry’s stakeholders. • Ensuring coordination and integration between the various programs and projects as parts of comprehensive development planning on both national and local levels. • Optimum exploitation for the financial and technical assistance from donors and international financial institutions according to the development priorities. • Contributing to the improvement of citizens’ economic and living conditions in all areas with focus on less privileged areas. • Contributing to the development and qualification of human resources according to the national plans and strategies.

Anakeeq Al-Khair Cooperative - Jordan

Initiative partner

Anaqeed Al-Khair cooperative is established to achieve the main following activities: o Dealing with groups and individuals and dependence on collaborative work to improve its participants’ economic, social and cultural rights. o encouraging agricultural projects and professional, industrial and combat unemployment and to provide material aid to needy families o Helping to provide small-scale projects to reduce poverty and unemployment.

Jordan River Foundation - Jordan

Initiative partner

Since inception, the Foundation has initiated numerous socio-economic projects for women, which aim to provide employment opportunities that in turn enhance their livelihoods. In tandem, these projects also work towards to enhancing women’s knowledge and skills in the production of traditional handicrafts, and in entrepreneurial skills. Such initiatives have succeeded in benefitting thousands of individuals, directly and indirectly, and today they continue to generate income for vulnerable communities and families across the Kingdom.

A Promising Start in an Arid Region by the Anaqeed Al-Khair Cooperative’s Impact on rural sustainable development

The  initiative of establishing Anaqeed Al-Khair project  in order to target a 14 villages for development, these different fargments have been  cluster assimilated into one cluster, The nature of collaboration between the local community and development planners reflects concern for the impact that development initiatives have on reshaping the socio–cultural, economic, and environmental future of the Bedouin community. The collaboration also provides insight for the cooperative to look for solutions which would mitigate the negative perceptions and attitudes of the community towards development efforts by 1) generating income, 2) sharing information and responsibilities, and 3) engaging community members in collective action. 

 

../file-system/small/pdf ../file-system/small/pdf Anaqeed Al Khair Project a report about Anaqeed Al Khair Project

The Anaqeed Al-Khair project location is in Jordan’s northeastern Badia, the
country’s arid and semi-arid zone. The Badia, which makes up approximately 80% of Jordan
(Al-Tabini, 2002) and is occupied by Bedouin, may be divided into two major areas based on
rainfall and vegetation cover. These are the steppe and the desert. The steppe (home to
Anaqeed Al-Khair ) has potential for providing animal feed, as it receives average annual
rainfall between 100mm and 200mm, and provides good vegetation for animal grazing. The
desert, on the other hand, receives less than 100mm of rain annually and has limited grazing
resources. The Badia experiences huge seasonal temperature fluctuations. In winter, the
minimum mean temperatures may drop to 2o-9o degrees C and snowfall and sub-zero
temperatures may occur. The summer maximum mean temperature is around 35o-38o C.
Low humidity causes high levels of evaporation. Rainfall between December and March,
with great differences in the intensity of showers and storms. Generally described as spatial
and temporal, maximum annual precipitation ranges from 250mm in the northwest to 50mm
in the south (Allison et al, 1998).

../file-system/small/pdf ../file-system/small/pdf Project presentation a presentation on Anakeed Al Khair Project
  • Sheep selection and management
    Since 2004, the Cooperative has adopted improved sheep feeding, a veterinary
    regime, selection and culling, and synchronization of ewe pregnancies to result in higher
    flock lambing and weaning percentages and greater twinning. This project was based on
    selecting the best sheep in the Badia region. Best sheep were defined as those with high milk
    productivity and breeding abilities. Indicators in the Badia, based on BRDC research,
    illustrate that good management with typical sheep is a profitable project. The 150 sheep
    purchased in May 2004 had increased to 250 by November 2005.
  • Honey production
    Since 2003, honey, produced from bees foraging on local desert plants, has been
    available for sale to the community or marketed in Amman. The next steps are to expand
    production and develop a more sophisticated marketing strategy, including a “Badia Honey”
    brand name.
    Similar products in Jordan are currently produced by the BRDC at a cost of 15 JD for 1
    kilo. Hence, there is currently an existing trademark for the honey, “As-Safawi Honey.” In
    general, honey brings 10 JD per kilo. However, the quality of the Badia honey is superior due
    to the medicinal plant that the bees pollinate.
  • Sun-dried tomatoes
    In the past year and a half, the cooperative has promoted organic production of a
    tomato variety with greater dry-matter content. A greater profit from dried tomatoes has
    convinced two local farmers to adopt production. The next steps include certification of
    organic production, better packaging and possible implementation of a brand name.
  • Forage production
    In 2003 the Cooperative attempted to produce alfalfa but was not successful due to
    inadequate amounts of water for irrigation. The Cooperative then tried barley, but felt this too
    was an unsustainable practice.Improved sheep wool and goat hair processing
    The Cooperative tried to spin the wool locally instead of selling raw material to
    Turkey and, in turn, buying spun wool and goat hair. The hand spinning by local women
    proved to be too time consuming. The next steps include importation of a semi-mechanical
    spinning machine from Australia to improve efficiency and decrease labor costs.
  • Wool manufacturing
    Comparable pricing of products
    This project will be based on producing high quality woolen handicrafts, with a focus
    on natural colors. The current market for wool products within Jordan is quite limited in that
    few manufacturers exist throughout the Jordanian Badia. However, in the products which are
    created, the wool is provided by the buyer and the charge for labor, alone, is 6 JD.
  • Goat hair processing: Beit sha’ar production (Bedouin tent)
    Comparable pricing of products
    Other than one semi-factory in Mafraq, there is no competition in the creation of beit
    sha’ar in Jordan. The cost of a complete medium-sized beit sha’ar is about 1187 JD.
  • Results
    The honey project earned about 7500 US$ in gross revenue over two seasons and the
    cooperative feels that this can be doubled through more attention to value-added practices
    such as packaging and branding. The sheep project earned about 15000 US$ in gross revenue
    since inception and it is expected that the flock will continue to improve over the next few
    years.
    The wool/goat hair production activity has weaknesses because it is not widely known
    that better quality, locally spun materials are available for sale. It is unlikely that this activity
    will be continued unless costs can be reduced (by importation of the semi-mechanical
    spinning machine from Australia) and diversified uses can be generated for the wool and goat
    hair as handicrafts or non-traditional products.Working together with the BRDC, the cooperative has demonstrated that successfully
    implemented ideas are often attractive to cooperative members and the surrounding
    communities and that the activities are subsequently adopted after the cooperative
    demonstrates success over a trial and error period. These models for transfer of technology
    are vitally important to the sustenance of Bedouins living in fragile rangeland ecosystems.
../file-system/small/pdf ../file-system/small/pdf A Promising Start in an Arid Region, Anaqeed Al Khair Project A Promising Start in an Arid Region- Assessment of the Anaqeed A

The nature of collaboration between the local community and Anaqeed Al-Khair
project implementers reflects concern for the impact that development initiatives have on
reshaping the sociocultural, economic and environmental future of the Bedouin community.
The collaboration helps to mitigate the negative perceptions and attitudes that community
members may have toward development efforts because not only does the Cooperative
management structure generate income, it also provides an avenue for community members
to share information and responsibilities. Furthermore, collaboration between the community
and the project team reflects the willingness of the government’s official vision to
incorporate multiple participants in the development design process and to support new
forms of organizational structures (i.e. local cooperatives, NGOs and research centers) in its
new policies for sustainable development programs. It also reflects the capability of these
organizations to employ effective development designers and implementers who can learn
more and adapt effectively through the collaboration process. Finally, collaboration reflects
the capacity and competence of each partner, particularly local community members, to play
a role in engaging, initiating and adapting local ideas into the design process (Hawamdeh,
2004).

Working together with the BRDC, the cooperative has demonstrated that successfully
implemented ideas are often attractive to cooperative members and the surrounding
communities and that the activities are subsequently adopted after the cooperative
demonstrates success over a trial and error period. These models for transfer of technology
are vitally important to the sustenance of Bedouins living in fragile rangeland ecosystems.


After several community meetings, participants chose a cooperative for the
management structure of the project. This approach provides flexibility and assurance that
the local community actively participates in the project and that benefits flow directly to
them. The cooperative was established late in 2002 with 16 member households. At the
current time, membership is 92 households. The Anaqeed Al-Khair Cooperative bases
planning and development decisions on members’ perspectives and knowledge. Thus, the
local community is empowered to explore possible areas of community development.

The main obstacles faced by the cooperative in marketing their products can be
summarized as follows:
1. Lack of experience in identifying desirable markets.
2. Insufficient attention to value-addition.
3. The need to decrease transport costs through more efficient scheduling of larger
allotments to larger markets.
4. Lack of a well-thought-out business plan based on analysis of input costs and sale
prices, advance contracts and new markets.
In response to the above problems, BRDC has led the cooperative in overcoming their
difficulties through the following efforts:
1. Assistance in finding buyers who offer better terms.
2. Establishment of market information systems that will open up more market channels.
3. Help in identifying value-adding technologies and products.
4. Research of methods for increasing production, which will generate greater income.
5. Analysis of ways to reduce costs of production and marketing that will lead to options
that can be tested by the cooperative.
6. Provision of guidelines on sanitary and phyto-sanitary procedures, grades and
standards to meet international trade requirements and generate consumer confidence.
7. Provision of guidelines and methods for establishment

../file-system/small/pdf ../file-system/small/pdf Profitability of Anaqeed Cooperative Enterprises a report on profitability of Anaqeed Cooperative Enterprises by NMSU

there are many postitive environmentatal impacts as follows: 

  • planting  more vegetation cover will fight againsit the desertification in arid and semil arid lands,
  • planting  more vegetation cover will enhance the awarness regarding to  adaptation of climate change in members minds and thier communities  
  • this project will work on  rehabilitation  the deterurated ecosystms in desert areas
  • conservation of the  the boidiversity in arid regions. 

Working together with the BRDC, the cooperative has demonstrated that successfully
implemented ideas are often attractive to cooperative members and the surrounding
communities and that the activities are subsequently adopted after the cooperative
demonstrates success over a trial and error period. These models for transfer of technology
are vitally important to the sustenance of Bedouins living in fragile rangeland ecosystems. we hope in the nearst future to have a fund for implement similar projects in many different potanially areas in remote areas among the country. 

Working together with the BRDC, the cooperative has
demonstrated that successfully implemented ideas are
often attractive to cooperative members and the
surrounding communities and that the activities are
subsequently adopted after the cooperative
demonstrates success over a trial and error period.


These models for transfer of technology are vitally
important to the sustenance of Bedouins living in fragile
rangeland ecosystems